How to index SQL with aggregate function SQL for Oracle?

Here the following is an example SQL shows you that select the maximum emp_address which is not indexed in the EMPLOYEE table with 3 million records, the emp_grade is an indexed column.

select max(emp_address) from employee a
where emp_grade<4000

As 80% of the EMPLOYEE table’s records will be retrieved to examine the maximum emp_address string. The query plan of this SQL shows a Table Access Full on EMPLOYEE table is reasonable.

How many ways to build an index to improve this SQL?
Although it is simple SQL, there are still 3 ways to build an index to improve this SQL, the following are the possible indexes that can be built for the SQL, the first one is a single column index and the 2 and 3 are the composite index with a different order.
1. EMP_ADDRESS
2. EMP_GRADE, EMP_ADDRESS
3. EMP_ADDRESS, EMP_GRADE

Most people may use the EMP_ADDRESS as the first choice to improve this SQL, let’s see what the query plan is if we build a virtual index for the EMP_ADDRESS column in the following, you can see the estimated cost is reduced by almost half, but this query plan is finally not being used after the physical index is built for benchmarking due to actual statistics is collected.

The following query shows the EMP_ADDRESS index is not used and the query plan is the same as the original SQL without any new index built.

Let’s try the second composite index (EMP_GRADE, EMP_ADDRESS), the new query plan shows an Index Fast Full Scan of this index, it is a reasonable plan which no table’s data is needed to retrieve. So, the execution time is reduced from 16.83 seconds to 3.89 seconds.

Let’s test the last composite index (EMP_ADDRESS, EMP_GRADE) that EMP_ADDRESS is placed as the first column in the composite index, it creates a new query plan that shows an extra FIRST ROW operation for the INDEX FULL SCAN (MIN/MAX), it highly reduces the execution time from 16.83 seconds to 0.08 seconds.

So, indexing sometimes is an art that needs you to pay more attention to it, some potential solutions may perform excess your expectation.

The best index solution is now more than 200 times better than the original SQL without index, this kind of index recommendation can be achieved by Tosska SQL Tuning Expert for Oracle automatically.

https://tosska.com/tosska-sql-tuning-expert-pro-tse-pro-for-oracle/

How to use FORCE INDEX Hints to tune an UPDATE SQL statement?

improve performance of sql query

We used to use FORCE INDEX hints to enable an index search for a SQL statement if a specific index is not used. It is due to the database SQL optimizer thinking that not using the specific index will perform better.  But enabling an index is not as simple as just adding an index search in the query plan, it may entirely change the structure of the query plan, which means that forecasting the performance of the new Force Index hints is not easy. Here is an example to show you how to use FORCE INDEX optimization hints to tune a SQL statement.

A simple example SQL that updates EMP_SUBSIDIARY if the emp_id is found in EMPLOYEE with certain criteria.

update EMP_SUBSIDIARY set emp_name=concat(emp_name,'(Headquarter)’)
where emp_id in
(SELECT emp_id
  FROM EMPLOYEE
WHERE  emp_salary <1000000
   and emp_grade<1150)

Here the following is the query plan of this SQL, it takes 18.38 seconds. The query shows a Full Table Scan of EMPLOYEE and then Nested Loop to EMP_SUBSIDIARY with a Unique Key Lookup of Emp_sub_PK index.

We can see that the filter condition “emp_salary <1000000 and emp_grade<1150” is used for the full table scan of EMPLOYEE. The estimated “filtered (ratio of rows produced per rows examined): 3.79%”, it seems the MySQL SQL optimizer is failed to use an index to scan the EMPLOYEE table. We should consider forcing MySQL to use either one of emp_salary or emp_grade index.

Unless you fully understand the data distribution and do a very precise calculation, otherwise you are not able to tell which index is the best?

Let’s try to force the index of emp_salary first.

update   EMP_SUBSIDIARY
set    emp_name=concat(emp_name,‘(Headquarter)’)
where emp_id in (select  emp_id
         from    EMPLOYEE FORCE INDEX(`emps_salary_inx`)
         where  emp_salary < 1000000
           and emp_grade < 1150)

This SQL takes 8.92 seconds and is 2 times better than the original query plan without force index hints.

Let’s try to force the index of emp_grade again.

update   EMP_SUBSIDIARY
set    emp_name=concat(emp_name,‘(Headquarter)’)
where emp_id in (select  emp_id
         from    EMPLOYEE FORCE INDEX(`emps_grade_inx`)
         where  emp_salary < 1000000
           and emp_grade < 1150)

Here is the result query plan of the Hints FORCE INDEX(`emps_grade_inx`) injected SQL and the execution time is reduced to 3.95 seconds. The new query plan shows an Index Range Scan of EMPLOYEE by EMP_GRADE index, the result is fed to a subquery2(temp table) and Nested Loop to EMP_SUBSIDIARY for the update. This query plan’s estimated cost is lower and performs better than the original SQL. It is due to the limited plan space in the real-time SQL optimization process, so this query plan cannot be generated for the original SQL text, so manual hints injection is necessary for this SQL statement to help MySQL database SQL optimizer to find a better query plan.

This kind of rewrite can be achieved by Tosska SQL Tuning Expert for MySQL automatically, it shows that the Hints injected SQL is more than 4.6 times faster than the original SQL.

https://tosska.com/tosska-sql-tuning-expert-tse-for-mysql-2/

How is the order of the columns in a composite index affecting a subquery performance for Oracle?

MySQL database and sql

We know the order of the columns in a composite index will determine the usage of the index or not against a table. A query will use a composite index only if the where clause of the query has at least the leading/left-most columns of the index in it. But, it is far more complicated in correlated subquery situations. Let’s have an example SQL to elaborate the details in the following.

SELECT D.*
FROM   department D
WHERE EXISTS (SELECT    Count(*)
         FROM     employee E
         WHERE     E.emp_id < 1050000
                AND E.emp_dept = D.dpt_id
         GROUP BY  E.emp_dept
         HAVING    Count(*) > 124)

Here the following is the query plan of the SQL, it takes 10 seconds to finish. We can see that the SQL can utilize E.emp_id and E.emp_dept indexes individually.

Let’s see if a new composite index can help to improve the SQL’s performance or not, as a rule of thumb, a higher selectivity column E.emp_id will be set as the first column in a composite index (E.emp_id, E.emp_dept).

The following is the query plan of a new composite index (E.emp_id, E.emp_dept) and the result performance is not good, it takes 11.8 seconds and it is even worse than the original query plan.

If we change the order of the columns in the composite index to (E.emp_dept, E.emp_id), the following query plan is generated and the speed is improved to 0.31 seconds.

The above two query plans are similar, the only difference is the “2” operation. The first composite index with first column E.emp_id uses an INDEX RANGE SCAN of the new composite index, but the second query plan uses an INDEX SKIP SCAN for the first column of E.emp_dept composite index. You can see there is an extra filter operation for E.emp_dept in the Predicate Information of INDEX RANGE SCAN of the index (E.emp_id, E.emp_dept). But the (E.emp_dept, E.emp_id) composite index use INDEX SKIP SCAN without extra operation to filter the E.emp_dept again.

So, you have to test the order of composite index very carefully for correlated subqueries, sometimes it will give you improvements that exceed your expectation.

This kind of index recommendation can be achieved by Tosska SQL Tuning Expert for Oracle automatically.

https://tosska.com/tosska-sql-tuning-expert-pro-tse-pro-for-oracle/

How to Tune SQL Statements with NO_RANGE_OPTIMIZATION Hints Injection?

There are some SQL statements with performance problem can be tuned by Hints injection only. Here is an example to show you how to use NO_RANGE_OPTIMIZATION optimization hints to tune a SQL statement.

A simple example SQL that retrieves data from EMPLOYEE and EMP_SAL_HIST tables.

select * from employee a,emp_sal_hist h
where  a.emp_id =h.sal_emp_id
and  a.emp_dept < ‘B’
and h.sal_salary  between 1000000 and 2000000

Here the following are the query plans of this SQL, it takes 24.3 seconds. The query shows an Index Range Scan (EMPS_DPT_INX) of EMPLOYEE and then Nested Loop to EMP_SAL_HIST with a Non-Unique Key Lookup of SALS_EMP_INX index.

The EMP_SAL_HIST is the employee’s salary history table which keeps more than one salary record for each employee. So, EMPLOYEE to EMP_SAL_HIST is a one-to-many relationship. The speed of a nested loop operation is highly dependent on the driving path of two nested loop tables. MySQL SQL optimizer estimated that the condition (a.emp_dept < ‘B’) can rapidly reduce the result set, so the driving path that “from EMPLOYEE to EMP_SAL_HIST” is selected.

Unless you fully understand the data distribution and do a very precise calculation, otherwise you are not able to tell whether this driving path is the best or not.

How to make MySQL consider another driving path “from EMP_SAL_HIST to EMPLOYEE”? Let’s take a look at MySQL documentation:

NO_RANGE_OPTIMIZATION: Disable index range access for the specified table or indexes. This hint also disables Index Merge and Loose Index Scan for the table or indexes. By default, range access is a candidate optimization strategy, so there is no hint for enabling it.

This hint may be useful when the number of ranges may be high and range optimization would require many resources.

To disable the Index Range Scan of the EMPLOYEE table, I explicitly add a Hints /*+ QB_NAME(QB1) NO_RANGE_OPTIMIZATION(`a`@QB1) */  to the SQL statement and hope that MySQL will use the Index Range Scan by the condition (h.sal_salary between 1000000 and 2000000) as the first driving table.

select  /*+ QB_NAME(QB1) NO_RANGE_OPTIMIZATION(`a`@QB1) */ *
from    employee a,
     emp_sal_hist h
where a.emp_id = h.sal_emp_id
     and a.emp_dept < ‘B’
     and h.sal_salary between 1000000 and 2000000

Here is the result query plan of the Hints injected SQL and the execution time is reduced to 10.01 seconds. The new query plan shows that the driving path is changed from EMP_SAL_HIST table nested loop to EMPLOYEE table. So, sometimes you may make use of the NO_RANGE_OPTIMIZATION hint to control the driving path order to see if MySQL can run your SQL faster.

This kind of rewrite can be achieved by Tosska SQL Tuning Expert for MySQL automatically, it shows that the Hints injected SQL is more than 2 times faster than the original SQL.

https://tosska.com/tosska-sql-tuning-expert-tse-for-mysql-2/

How to Tune SQL Statement with CASE Expression for SQL Server II?

oracle database performance tuning

We have discussed how to tune a CASE expression SQL with hardcoded literals in my last blog:

How to Tune SQL Statement with CASE Expression for SQL Server I?

SELECT *
FROM EMPLOYEE
 WHERE
 CASE
  when emp_id  < 1001000 then ‘Old Employee’ 
  when emp_dept <‘B’     then ‘Old Department’
 ELSE  ‘Normal’
 END =  ‘old Employee’

If I change the hardcoded literal to a @var, what will be the performance of the last blog’s rewritten SQL?

SELECT *
FROM EMPLOYEE
 WHERE
 CASE
  when emp_id  < 1001000 then ‘Old Employee’ 
  when emp_dept <‘B’     then ‘Old Department’
 ELSE  ‘Normal’
 END =  @var

I use the same method in my last blog to rewrite this SQL into the following multiple OR syntax, but the SQL Server optimizer change back to a full table scan of the EMPLOYEE table. It is because the SQL Server cannot do a good cardinality estimation of the variable of @var.

select *
from  EMPLOYEE
where emp_id < 1005000
     and ‘Old Employee’ = @var
     or not ( emp_id < 1005000 )
     and emp_dept < ‘B’
     and ‘Old Department’ = @var
     or not ( emp_id < 1005000 )
     and not ( emp_dept < ‘B’ )
     and ‘Normal’ = @var

We can rewrite the CASE expression into the following syntax with multiple UNION ALL statements, this syntax is more complicated than the rewrite with multiple OR conditions in my last blog. But it can make SQL Server improve the query plan to be more efficient.

select *
from  EMPLOYEE
where emp_id < (select 1005000)
     and ‘Old Employee’ = @var
union all
select *
from  EMPLOYEE
where ( not ( emp_id < 1005000 )
       and ‘Old Employee’ = @var
     or @var is null )
     and emp_id >= 1005000
     and emp_dept < ‘B’
     and ‘Old Department’ = @var
union all
select *
from  EMPLOYEE
where ( not ( emp_id < 1005000 )
       and ‘Old Employee’ = @var
     or @var is null )
     and ( not ( emp_id >= 1005000
         and emp_dept < ‘B’
         and ‘Old Department’ = @var )
       or @var is null )
     and emp_id >= 1005000
     and emp_dept >= ‘B’
     and ‘Normal’ = @var

Here is the query plan of the rewritten SQL and the speed is 0.448 seconds. It is 5 times better than the original syntax. People may think that there are two table scan operations of EMPLOYEE that will slow down the whole process, but actually, the corresponding filter operations will stop the table scan operations immediately due to the filter conditions ‘Normal’ = @var and ‘Old Department’ = @var will not be satisfied. This kind of query plan cannot be generated by SQL Server’s internal SQL optimizer, it means that you cannot use Hints injection to get this query plan.

This kind of rewrite can be achieved by Tosska SQL Tuning Expert for SQL Server automatically.

Tosska SQL Tuning Expert (TSES™) for SQL Server® – Tosska Technologies Limited

How to Tune SQL Statement with CASE Expression for SQL Server I?

oracle database performance tuning

Here the following is a simple SQL statement with a CASE expression syntax.

SELECT *
FROM EMPLOYEE
WHERE
CASE
when emp_id  < 1001000 then ‘Old Employee’
when emp_dept <‘B’     then ‘Old Department’
ELSE  ‘Normal’
END =  ‘old Employee’

Here the following are the query plans of this SQL, it takes 2.23 seconds in a cold cache situation, which means data will be cached during the SQL is executing. The query shows a Full Table Scan of the EMPLOYEE table due to the CASE expression cannot utilize the emp_id index or emp_dept index.

We can rewrite the CASE expression into the following syntax with multiple OR conditions.

select *
from  EMPLOYEE
where emp_id < 1005000
and ‘Old Employee’ = ‘Old Employee’
or not ( emp_id < 1005000 )
and emp_dept < ‘B’
and ‘Old Department’ = ‘Old Employee’
or not ( emp_id < 1005000 )
and not ( emp_dept < ‘B’ )
and ‘Normal’ = ‘Old Employee’

Here is the query plan of the rewritten SQL and the speed is 0.086 seconds. It is 25 times better than the original syntax. The new query plan shows an Index Seek of EMP_ID index.

This SQL rewrite is useful when the CASE expression is equal to a hardcoded literal, but if the literal “  =’Old Employee’ ” replaced by a variable “ = :var ”, this rewrite may not be useful, I will discuss it in my next blog.

This kind of rewrite can be achieved by Tosska SQL Tuning Expert for SQL Server automatically.

Expert (TSES™) for SQL Server® – Tosska Technologies Limited

How to Tune SQL Statements with Rewrite and Hints Injection for MySQL?

sql tuning for MySQL

There are some SQL statements with performance problem have to be tuned by SQL syntax rewrite and Hints injection, it is a little bit difficult for SQL tuning newcomers to master this technique. Developers not only have to understand the relationship between SQL syntax and the final query plan generation but have to understand the usage of optimizer hints and its limitations. Sometimes these two tuning techniques application will affect each other in a complex SQL statement.

Here is a simple example SQL that retrieves data from EMPLOYEE and DEPARTMENT tables.

select  * from employee,department
where emp_dept=dpt_id
   and emp_dept<‘L’
   and emp_id<1500000
   and emp_salary= dpt_avg_salary
order by dpt_avg_salary

Here the following are the query plans of this SQL, it takes 7.7 seconds to finish. The query shows a “Full Table Scan Department” and nested loop Employee table with a Non-Unique Key Lookup EMPS_SALARY_INX.

You can see that this SQL cannot utilize index scan even though the dpt_dept is an indexed field. It is because the condition emp_dept<‘L’ is not explicitly induced the condition dpt_id < ‘L’ although emp_dept=dpt_id is also listed in the where clause.

To enable the index search of Department table, I explicitly add a condition dpt_id < ‘L’ to the SQL statement as the following:

select   *
from  employee,
     department
where  emp_dept = dpt_id
     and dpt_id < ‘L’
     and emp_dept < ‘L’
     and emp_id < 1500000
     and emp_salary = dpt_avg_salary
order by  dpt_avg_salary

Here is the query plan of the rewritten SQL and the execution time is reduced to 3.4 seconds. The new query plan shows that an Index Range Scan is used for the Department table and nested loop Employee table.

You may find that the nested loop to Employee by EMPS_SALARY_INX lookup may result into a lot of random access to the Employee table. Let me add a BKA hint to ask MySQL to use ‘Batched Key Access’ to join the two tables.

select   /*+ QB_NAME(QB1) BKA(`employee`@QB1) */ *
from  employee,
     department
where  emp_dept = dpt_id
     and dpt_id < ‘L’
     and emp_dept < ‘L’
     and emp_id < 1500000
     and emp_salary = dpt_avg_salary
order by  dpt_avg_salary

The new query plan shows a Batched Key Access is used to join Department and Employee tables, you can BAK information from MySQL manual for details, the new plan takes only 1.99 seconds and it is more than 3 times better than the original SQL syntax.

This kind of rewrite can be achieved by Tosska SQL Tuning Expert for MySQL automatically, it shows that the rewrite is more than 3 times faster than the original SQL.

https://tosska.com/tosska-sql-tuning-expert-tse-for-mysql-2/

How to Tune SQL Statement with CASE Expression for SQL Server I?

sql performance monitoring

Here the following is a simple SQL statement with a CASE expression syntax.

SELECT *
FROM EMPLOYEE
WHERE
CASE
when  emp_id   < 1001000 then ‘Old Employee’
when  emp_dept <‘B’   then ‘Old Department’
ELSE‘Normal’
END = ‘old Employee’

Here the following are the query plans of this SQL, it takes 2.23 seconds in a cold cache situation, which means data will be cached during the SQL is executing. The query shows a Full Table Scan of the EMPLOYEE table due to the CASE expression cannot utilize the emp_id index or emp_dept index.

We can rewrite the CASE expression into the following syntax with multiple OR conditions.

select *
from  EMPLOYEE
where  emp_id < 1005000
and ‘Old Employee’ = ‘Old Employee’
or not  ( emp_id < 1005000 )
and emp_dept < ‘B’
and‘Old Department’ = ‘Old Employee’
or not  ( emp_id < 1005000 )
and not ( emp_dept < ‘B’ )
and‘Normal’ = ‘Old Employee’

Here is the query plan of the rewritten SQL and the speed is 0.086 seconds. It is 25 times better than the original syntax. The new query plan shows an Index Seek of EMP_ID index.

This SQL rewrite is useful when the CASE expression is equal to a hardcoded literal, but if the literal “  =’Old Employee’ ” replaced by a variable “ = :var ”, this rewrite may not be useful, I will discuss it in my next blog.

This kind of rewrite can be achieved by Tosska SQL Tuning Expert for SQL Server automatically.

Tosska SQL Tuning Expert (TSES™) for SQL Server® – Tosska Technologies Limited

How to Tune SQL Statement with OR conditions in a Subquery for SQL Server?

sql performance monitoring

The following is an example that shows a SQL statement with an EXISTS subquery. The SQL counts the records from the EMPLOYEE table if the OR conditions are satisfied in the subquery of the DEPARTMENT table.

select countn(*) from employee a where
exists (select ‘x’ from department b
    where a.emp_id=b.dpt_manager or a.emp_salary=b.dpt_avg_salary
     )

Here the following is the query plan in the Tosska proprietary tree format, it takes 4 minutes and 29 seconds to finish.

The query plan shows a Nested Loops from EMPLOYEE to full table scan DEPARTMENT, it is the main problem of the entire query plan, the reason is the SQL Server cannot resolve this OR conditions  ”a.emp_id=b.dpt_manager or a.emp_salary=b.dpt_avg_salary” by other join operations.

Let me rewrite the OR conditions in the subquery into a UNION ALL subquery in the following, the first part of the UNION ALL in the subquery represents the “a.emp_id=b.dpt_manager” condition, the second part represents the “a.emp_salary=b.dpt_avg_salary” condition but exclude the data that already satisfied with the first condition.

select  count(*)
from   employee a
where  exists ( select  ‘x’
        from   department b
        where  a.emp_id = b.dpt_manager
        union all
        select  ‘x’
        from   department b
        where  ( not ( a.emp_id = b.dpt_manager )
            or b.dpt_manager is null )
            and a.emp_salary = b.dpt_avg_salary )

Here the following is the query plan of the rewritten SQL, it looks a little bit complex, but the performance is very good now, it takes only 0.447 seconds. There are two Hash Match joins that are used to replace the original Nested Loops from EMPLOYEE to full table scan DEPARTMENT.

Although the steps to the final rewrite is a little bit complicated, this kind of rewrites can be achieved by Tosska SQL Tuning Expert for SQL Server automatically, it shows that the rewrite is more than 600 times fastAlthough the steps to the final rewrite is a little bit complicated, this kind of rewrites can be achieved by Tosska SQL Tuning Expert for SQL Server automatically, it shows that the rewrite is more than 600 times faster than the original SQL.

Tosska SQL Tuning Expert (TSES™) for SQL Server® – Tosska Technologies Limited

How to Tune SQL Statements to Run SLOWER… but Make Users Feel BETTER (Oracle)?

MySQL database and SQL

Your end-users may keep on complaining about some functions of their database application are running slow, but you may found that those SQL statements are already reached their maximum speed in the current Oracle and hardware configuration. There may be no way to improve the SQL unless you are willing to upgrade your hardware. To make your users feel better, sometimes, you don’t have to tune your SQL to run faster but to tune your SQL to run slower for certain application’s SQL statements.

This is an example SQL that is used to display the information from tables Emp_sal_hist and Employee if they are satisfied with certain criteria. This SQL is executed as an online query and users have to wait for at least 5 seconds before any data will be shown on screen after the mouse click.

select * from employee a,emp_sal_hist c
where a.emp_name like ‘A%’
     and a.emp_id=c.sal_emp_id
     and c.sal_salary<1800000
order by c.sal_emp_id

Here the following is the query plan and execution statistics of the SQL, it takes 10.41 seconds to extract all 79374 records and the first records return time ”Response Time” is 5.72 seconds. The query shows a MERGE JOIN of EMPLOYEE and EMP_SAL_HIST table, there are two sorting operations of the corresponding tables before it is being merged into the final result. It is the reason that users have to wait at least 5 seconds before they can see anything shows on the screen.

As the condition “a.emp_id = c.sal_emp_id”, we know that “ORDER BY c.sal_emp_id“ is the same as “ORDER BY a.emp_id“,  as SQL syntax rewrite cannot force a specified operation in the query plan for this SQL, I added an optimizer hint /*+ INDEX(@SEL$1 A EMPLOYEE_PK) */ to reduce the sorting time of order by a.emp_id.

SELECT  /*+ INDEX(@SEL$1 A EMPLOYEE_PK) */ *
FROM    employee a,
      emp_sal_hist c
WHERE a.emp_name LIKE ‘A%’
    AND a.emp_id=c.sal_emp_id
    AND c.sal_salary<1800000
ORDER BY c.sal_emp_id

Although the overall Elapsed Time is 3 seconds higher in the new query plan, the response time is now reduced from 5.72 seconds to 1.16 seconds, so the users can see the first page of information on the screen more promptly and I believe most users don’t care whether there are 3 more seconds for all 79374 records to be returned. That is why SQL tuning is an art rather than science when you are going to manage your users’ expectations.

This kind of rewrite can be achieved by Tosska SQL Tuning Expert for Oracle automatically.

https://tosska.com/tosska-sql-tuning-expert-pro-tse-pro-for-oracle/